Willibrord as a Political Actor Between Early Medieval Ireland, Britain and Merovingian Francia (658-739)

1000 Worte Forschung: PhD thesis in Medieval History, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin, ongoing. 

English version

(Deutschsprachige Version hier)

In May 2020, local politicians from Germany and Luxembourg protested against the decision of the German government to close the border between both countries as a measure to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The participants assembled in front of a statue of Willibrord, the so-called ‘apostle of the Frisians’ and patron saint of Luxembourg, in the Luxembourgish town of Echternach on the river Sauer, which marks the border between the two states. The protesters tied one of their face masks, displaying the flag of the European union, to the statue of the saint.[1]

Why was the early medieval missionary Willibrord (658–739) chosen as the face of the protest? At first sight, his biography does reveal a ‘European’ dimension: born in Northumbria, he spent twelve years in Ireland before he left for the continent in 690. Five years later, he was consecrated in Rome as bishop of the newly created see of Utrecht. In 697/8, he founded the monastery of Echternach near Trier, which became one of the most important centers of manuscript production north of the Alps in the eighth century. Today, a sign in the Carolingian crypt of the abbey of Echternach introduces the saint as the ‘apostle of Europe’ to the visitors. The portrayal of Willibrord as a ‘European’ avant la lettre, however, represents but one dimension of his image in modern historiography. To Wilhelm Levison (1876–1947), he was the ‘English’ counterpart of Columbanus (d. 615). In Luxembourg, the historian Camille Wampach (1884–1958) promoted the idea of a national saint in the face of the occupation of Luxembourg by Nazi Germany. Catholic and Protestant scholars in the Netherlands argued over his role in the context of confessional disputes, and Mary McAleese, the former President of Ireland (1997–2011), referred to Willibrord as a ‘true European’ and ‘Ireland’s first ambassador to Luxembourg’.[2]

How do the different national appropriations of Willibrord fit in with his transformation into a ‘European’ saint? A key aspect is the connection between his mission and the rise of the Carolingians. Willibrord’s arrival in Frisia has been regarded as the beginning of a new phase of the Christianisation of medieval Europe, supported by the family of Pippin II (d. 714), the great-grandfather of Charlemagne (d. 814). From this perspective, Willibrord’s consecration in Rome in 695 with Pippin’s consent set the foundation for the alliance between the early Carolingians and the papacy, which culminated in the deposition of the Merovingian dynasty in 751 and the establishment of a Christian empire under Charlemagne. Within this framework, which has been complemented by the transformation of Charlemagne into a symbol of European unification after World War II, historians from Ireland to Luxembourg have been able to lay claim on Willibrord as a founding figure of Carolingian Europe. This process already began in the Middle Ages: in Alcuin’s (d. 804) Vita Willibrordi (c. 796) and the Liber aureus Epternacensis (compiled between 1191 and 1231), which contains the only copies of the early medieval charters from Echternach,[3] Willibrord’s career was subordinated to a Carolingian conception of history, according to which his impact was primarily shaped by the family of Pippin II and their network of supporters.

Due to the scarcity of sources about Willibrord from his own lifetime, historians have long studied his activity from the ‘Carolingian’ angle prevalent in later texts. The result was an inconsistent depiction of Willibrord: on the one hand, the creation of the see of Utrecht has been described as pathbreaking with regard to the ecclesiastical history of the Frankish kingdom. On the other hand, the longstanding perception of Boniface (d. 754) as the trailblazing reformer of the Frankish church led to the marginalisation of Willibrord in modern scholarship, as he emerged from such a comparison as less successful than his West Saxon contemporary. In the words of Theodor Schieffer (1910–1992), Willibrord’s time represented an important but still ‘unfinished’ stage in the formation of Carolingian Europe.[4] The depiction of Willibrord as a ‘European’ saint obscures the fact that the study of the relation between the Insular world and the Frankish kingdom in the late Merovingian period has often been reduced to debates about the cultural background of foundations like Echternach (‘Irish’ or ‘Northumbrian’?) and to the question of the alliance between missionaries and the Carolingians. A closer look at the sources reveals a greater complexity: the charters of the Liber aureus and the martyrological entries in the so-called Calendar of Willibrord[5] reflect an ecclesiastical and political horizon, which cannot be reduced to either Ireland, Northumbria or the Carolingians. Recent studies have introduced the notion of Willibrord as a ‘political player’: supported by both secular and ecclesiastical landholders, he was able to establish his network between Utrecht and Trier and to expand it to the periphery of the Frankish kingdom in Thuringia long before Charles Martel (d. 741) secured his family’s dominant position.

Willibrord’s role as a political actor has not yet been the focus of a separate study. The aim of the ongoing PhD thesis, funded by the Luxembourg National Research Fund, is to investigate the scope of Willibrord’s action on the continent by removing the ‘Carolingian’ framework. Thereby, new questions arise with regard to the strategies available to Insular clerics in Francia around 700: instead of perceiving Willibrord primarily as a missionary on the outskirts of the Frankish world, the thesis asks how he was able to establish and maintain his position between the Rhine and the Moselle. This area was marked by the intersection of influences from the Insular world, the Merovingian court and Frisia. The perception of Willibrord as a ‘European’ saint is also a reminder of the geographical extent of his activity. Yet the context in which he operated was not a mere prelude to the age of Boniface: a new study of Willibrord opens up the possibility to perceive the late Merovingian period as a time of its own, one characterized by extensive ecclesiastical networks, complex political constellations and important developments in manuscript production and intellectual thought.

 

All URLs have been verified on May 11, 2021.

 

Deutsche Version

(English version hier)

Im Mai 2020 protestierten an der deutsch-luxemburgischen Grenze mehrere Lokalpolitiker beider Länder gegen die Entscheidung der deutschen Regierung, die Grenze zwischen den zwei Staaten aufgrund der COVID-19-Pandemie zu schließen. Die Teilnehmer*innen versammelten sich in der luxemburgischen Stadt Echternach und befestigten eine Schutzmaske mit der Flagge der europäischen Union an einer Statue von Willibrord, der sogenannte „Apostel der Friesen“ und Schutzpatron Luxemburgs.[6]

Warum wählte man den frühmittelalterlichen Missionar Willibrord (658–739) als Symbol des Protests gegen die Grenzschließung? Seine Biografie offenbart durchaus eine „europäische“ Dimension: Er wurde in Northumbrien geboren, verbrachte zwölf Jahre in Irland und gelangte schließlich im Jahre 690 über das Rhein-Maas-Delta auf den Kontinent. Fünf Jahre später erhielt er nach seiner Bischofsweihe in Rom das neu entstandene Bistum Utrecht. Im Jahre 687/8 gründete er das Kloster Echternach in der Nähe von Trier, welches sich im 8. Jahrhundert zu einem der bedeutendsten Zentren der Handschriftenproduktion nördlich der Alpen entwickelte. Steigt man heute in der Echternacher Abtei in die karolingische Krypta hinab, so erblickt man vor dem Grabmal des Heiligen ein Schild mit der Aufschrift „Apostel Europas“. Die Stilisierung Willibrords zum „Europäer“ avant la lettre stellt jedoch nur eine Dimension seiner Rezeption in der modernen Forschung dar. Wilhelm Levison (1876–1947) charakterisierte ihn als das „englische“ Pendant zu Columban von Luxeuil († 615), der luxemburgische Historiker Camille Wampach (1884–1958) stilisierte ihn infolge der deutschen Besatzung seines Landes im zweiten Weltkrieg zu einem nationalen Heiligen, in den Niederlanden wurde Willibrord zu einem Streitpunkt zwischen katholischen und protestantischen Historiker*innen, und die frühere Präsidentin von Irland, Mary McAleese (1997–2011), nannte ihn einen „wahren Europäer“ und den „ersten irischen Botschafter in Luxemburg“.[7]

Wie passen die verschiedenen nationalen Vereinnahmungen zur Transformation Willibrords in einen „europäischen“ Heiligen? Eine zentrale Rolle spielt die Verbindung zwischen seiner Mission und dem Aufstieg der Karolinger. Die Ankunft Willibrords in Friesland wurde von der älteren Forschung als der Beginn einer neuen Phase der Christianisierung betrachtet, die in erster Linie von der Familie Pippins II. († 714), des Urgroßvaters Karls des Großen († 814), vorangetrieben wurde. Demnach legte Pippin mit seiner Unterstützung für Willibrords Bischofsweihe in Rom den Grundstein für die spätere Allianz zwischen den Karolingern und dem Papsttum, die letztlich zur Absetzung der merowingischen Dynastie im Jahre 751 und der Errichtung eines christlichen Imperiums unter Karl dem Großen führte. Auf Grundlage dieser Meistererzählung, die durch die Stilisierung von Karl dem Großen zu einem Symbol der europäischen Vereinigung nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg erweitert wurde, konnten Historiker*innen von Irland bis Luxemburg Willibrord als Gründungsfigur des karolingischen Europas für sich beanspruchen. Zurückverfolgen lässt sich dieser Prozess bis ins Mittelalter: In Alkuins († 804) Vita Willibrordi (um 796) und im Liber aureus Epternacensis, das zwischen 1191 und 1231 entstand und als einzige Quelle Kopien von frühmittelalterlichen Urkunden aus Echternach enthält,[8] wurde Willibrord bereits in ein prokarolingisches Geschichtsbild eingefügt. Demzufolge war sein Handlungsspielraum in erster Linie durch die Familie Pippins II. und ihr Netzwerk aus Unterstützern im nordöstlichen Teil des Frankenreichs bestimmt.

Aufgrund der Knappheit an zeitgenössischen Quellen zu Willibrord ist der Zugang der Geschichtswissenschaft stark durch den „karolingischen“ Blickwinkel späterer Texte geprägt. In der modernen Forschung erscheint das Bild Willibrords daher meist widersprüchlich: Einerseits wird die Gründung des Bistums Utrecht als bedeutende Etappe in der Entwicklung der fränkischen Kirche betrachtet. Andererseits lässt sich weiterhin eine gewisse Marginalisierung Willibrords in der Frühmittelalterforschung feststellen. Die tief verankerte Wahrnehmung seines westsächsischen Zeitgenossen Bonifatius († 754) als bahnbrechendem Reformer der fränkischen Kirche lässt Willibrord im direkten Vergleich als erfolglos erscheinen. Für Theodor Schieffer (1910–1992) stellte Willibrords Zeit „etwas Unfertiges, noch Werdendes“ dar; einen Zwischenschritt auf dem Weg ins karolingische Europa.[9]

Die aktuelle Darstellung Willibrords als „europäischer“ Heiliger verdeckt den Umstand, dass die Beziehungen zwischen Irland, Britannien und dem Frankenreich in der späten Merowingerzeit im Forschungsdiskurs oft auf zwei Aspekte reduziert wurden: einerseits auf die Frage, welchem kulturellen Hintergrund Gründungen wie Echternach entsprangen („irisch“ oder „northumbrisch“?), andererseits auf das Bündnis zwischen Missionaren und den frühen Karolingern. Bei einem genaueren Blick auf die Quellen zeigt sich jedoch eine größere Komplexität: Die Urkunden im Liber aureus und die Nekrologeinträge im sogenannten Willibrord-Kalender[10] beziehen sich auf einen religiösen und politischen Horizont, der sich weder auf Irland, noch auf Northumbrien oder die Karolinger reduzieren lässt. In jüngeren Studien wurde Willibrord zunehmend als politischer Akteur charakterisiert: Unterstützt durch Schenkungen von weltlichen und kirchlichen Landbesitzern, war Willibrord in der Lage, zwischen Utrecht und Trier sein eigenes Netzwerk aufzubauen und es bis nach Thüringen, in die Peripherie des Frankenreichs, zu erweitern. Dabei lassen sich diese Kontakte auf die Zeit vor der Machtergreifung Karl Martells († 741) datieren.

Bisher wurde Willibrords Rolle als politischer Akteur noch nicht im Rahmen einer größeren Studie untersucht. Ziel des noch laufenden, vom Fonds National de la Recherche Luxembourg unterstützen Dissertationsprojekts ist es, Willibrords Handlungsspielraum auf dem Kontinent abseits eines „karolingischen“ Rahmens zu betrachten. Damit wird der Blick auf die Optionen und Strategien gelenkt, die Klerikern aus Irland und Britannien um 700 zur Verfügung standen, um sich in die bestehenden kirchlichen und politischen Verhältnisse im Frankenreich zu integrieren. Anstatt Willibrord vorrangig als Missionar in der Peripherie der fränkischen Welt zu betrachten, fragt das Dissertationsprojekt danach, wie Willibrord in der Lage war, sich im Raum zwischen Rhein und Mosel zu etablieren und seine Position zu erhalten. Dieses Gebiet war eine Schnittstelle, geprägt von Einflüssen aus Irland, Britannien, dem merowingischen Königshof und Friesland. Die moderne Wahrnehmung Willibrords als „europäischer“ Heiliger ist somit auch ein Überbleibsel seiner vielfältigen Verbindungen. Jedoch sollte der Kontext, in dem Willibrord agierte, nicht lediglich als Zwischenstufe zum Zeitalter des Bonifatius betrachtet werden: Ein halbes Jahrhundert vor der karolingischen Machtergreifung im Frankenreich agierte Willibrord bereits in einer Welt, die von überregionalen kirchlichen Netzwerken, komplexen politischen Konstellationen und bedeutenden Entwicklungen im Bereich der Handschriftenproduktion und der Bildung geprägt war.

 

Alle angegebenen Links wurden am 11. Mai 2021 geprüft.

 

[1] Trierischer Volksfreund. Trotz Protesten bleiben die Grenzen weiterhin geschlossen, Trier, 10 May 2020, https://www.volksfreund.de/region/trotz-protesten-bleiben-die-grenzen-weiterhin-geschlossen_aid-50477221.

[2] Dermot Mulligan, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín and Pierre Kauthen, Re-discovering St. Willibrord. Patron Saint of Luxembourg, First Apostle of the Netherlands and his County Carlow Connection, Carlow 2018, p. 12.

[3] Ms. Gotha, Forschungsbibliothek, Memb. I 71, URN: urn:nbn:de:urmel-532261b9-1aee-4f9d-ad7c-d00d5c00ba849.

[4] Theodor Schieffer, Winfrid-Bonifatius und die christliche Grundlegung Europas, Darmstadt 21972, p. 10.

[5] Ms. Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat. 10837, fol. 34v–40r, ARK: ark:/12148/btv1b6001113z.

[6] Trierischer Volksfreund. Trotz Protesten bleiben die Grenzen weiterhin geschlossen, Trier, 10. Mai 2020, https://www.volksfreund.de/region/trotz-protesten-bleiben-die-grenzen-weiterhin-geschlossen_aid-50477221.

[7] Dermot Mulligan, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín and Pierre Kauthen, Re-discovering St. Willibrord. Patron Saint of Luxembourg, First Apostle of the Netherlands and his County Carlow Connection, Carlow 2018, S. 12.

[8] Ms. Gotha, Forschungsbibliothek, Memb. I 71, URN: urn:nbn:de:urmel-532261b9-1aee-4f9d-ad7c-d00d5c00ba849.

[9] Theodor Schieffer, Winfrid-Bonifatius und die christliche Grundlegung Europas, Darmstadt 21972, S. 10.

[10] Ms. Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat. 10837, fol. 34v–40r, ARK: ark:/12148/btv1b6001113z.

 

D O W N L O A D

(PDF/A-Version)


Empfohlene Zitierweise / Suggested Citation: Michel Summer, Willibrord as a Political Actor Between Early Medieval Ireland, Britain and Merovingian Francia (658–739), in: Mittelalter. Interdisziplinäre Forschung und Rezeptionsgeschichte 4 (2021), pp. 51–56, DOI: 10.26012/mittelalter-26492.


Dieser Artikel wurde redaktionell betreut von Evina Steinova und Björn Gebert.

Michel Summer

Michel Summer ist Doktorand am Trinity College Dublin.

More Posts - Website


Das könnte dich auch interessieren …

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Diese Website verwendet Akismet, um Spam zu reduzieren. Erfahre mehr darüber, wie deine Kommentardaten verarbeitet werden.

Suche in OpenEdition Search

Sie werden weitergeleitet zur OpenEdition Search