Author: Evina Steinova

Notam superponere studui: the use of technical signs in the Carolingian period

1000 Worte Forschung: PhD project in History, Huygens ING/Utrecht University If you were asked to pinpoint a scientist in a crowd, how would you recognize one? Or if you were asked to identify a scientific publication among other books, how...

Asteriscos et obelos suis locis restitui – the revision of the Psalter during the Carolingian Renaissance

The Carolingian period is chiefly remembered as a period of renovatio. In joint cooperation, the Carolingian dynasty and intellectual elites saw to revision of a number of practices and texts. Some of the artifacts of these reforms and their agents...

Carolingian Critters IV: Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, BPL 67F. A peep into the workshop of a ‘text engineer’

After some time, I am back with news from the world of Carolingian manuscripts. My critter this time is manuscript BPL 67F of the University Library of the University of Leiden, a collection of different glossographic texts from the late...

Carolingian Critters III: Munich, BSB, Clm 6253

The pick of today is slightly less Carolingian than the other critters that were paraded here. It is another manuscript from Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich with a shelfmark Clm 6253. Clm 6253, the first volume of a three-volume copy of...

Workshop report: Easy Tools for Difficult Texts (18.-19.4.13, Den Haag)

Digital Humanities Workshop funded by the COST Action IS1005: Medieval Europe – Medieval Cultures and Technological Resources, and Huygens ING I had recently the opportunity to attend the workshop Easy Tools for Difficult Texts, a two-day event at Huygens ING,...

An incredible new discovery!

An incredible new discovery has been made recently to reveal a wholly unknown text with sumptious illuminations bearing the title Fabula Rodonis peccatoris nequissimi (The story of Rodo the most worthless sinner).  The first folio of this newly discovered pieces...

Carolingian Critters II: Leiden, Voss. Lat. F 113

Introduction[1] Ms. Leiden, RB Voss. Lat. F 113 is one of the more precious pieces of the Special Collection at Leiden, containing two rare geographical texts, the Cosmographia of Aethicus Ister and the anonymous De situ orbis terrae. It is...